HEAT: SE - Question About Audio Options

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MikeSkerritt

HEAT: SE - Question About Audio Options

#1 Post by MikeSkerritt » Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:24 pm

Can anyone confirm or deny if there will in fact be an English 2.0 mix included on this new release? The 5.1 mix on the original release is a little back-heavy, and since my system is your basic 2.0 system, I had to crank the volume way up to hear the dialogue properly. I've seen DVD news sites claim that there WILL be a 2.0 mix included, but the artwork shows nothing of it.

Thanks!!

M

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AndyDursin
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#2 Post by AndyDursin » Sat Jan 22, 2005 9:49 pm

Mike,
Warner's official press release says only that it will have English and French 5.1 tracks, sadly.

Looks like a great Special Edition -- unfortunately it's being handled by a PR firm that hasn't been of much help to me in the past, so I may have to buy it myself ;)

Cheers,
Andy

MikeSkerritt

#3 Post by MikeSkerritt » Sat Jan 22, 2005 11:28 pm

Ah, nuts. :)

Thanks, Andy.

Stay warm up there, man. Looks like you're getting three times the winter we just got here.

Eric W.
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#4 Post by Eric W. » Tue Jan 25, 2005 1:31 pm

What's with the DTS omissions on obvious SE discs like these? I just don't get it...

MikeSkerritt

#5 Post by MikeSkerritt » Tue Jan 25, 2005 2:40 pm

Someday I'll need a tutorial about the difference between DTS and the various Dolby classifications. From what I understand DTS is better, but I have no idea why. What makes it better?

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AndyDursin
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#6 Post by AndyDursin » Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:38 pm

I'm not overly techno-savvy on this, but DTS has always been preferable to Dolby Digital among cinephiles. The main reason being is that DTS is supposed to be closer to the bandwith of an actual CD track. DTS tracks are less compressed than Dolby Digital, requiring more space....and all of this goes back to how the formats are used in theatrical exhibition. DTS tracks are actually ON separate CDs (timed precisely with the film being projected), whereas the more-compressed Dolby Digital tracks are on the film itself.

On DVD, it's again a matter of compression. DTS tracks require more space than DD, meaning they're less compressed than Dolby Digital tracks. Hence, the DTS track is almost always louder, clearer, crisper, and more dynamic than Dolby Digital. (It's also a reason not every DVD has a DTS track -- it can take up twice the space of a Dolby Digital track).

I can always discern a difference between the two formats -- the DTS track is almost always "warmer," and never needs to be turned up as loud as a 5.1 DD mix.

Most DVD mixes, however, can't compare to a dynamic laserdisc presentation, which is still the best audiophile home format.....uncompressed, pure DTS and Dolby Digital tracks absolutely rock on laserdisc, and if you have a basic (2-channel or mono) Dolby Surround track, the laserdisc beats DVD hands down every time (as there's little compression involved on LD -- it's like having an actual CD of the soundtrack). DVD audio tracks can get awfully compressed dependant on the movie.

MikeSkerritt

#7 Post by MikeSkerritt » Wed Jan 26, 2005 9:30 am

Wow, thanks, Andy! That really clears it up for me.

:)

Eric W.
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#8 Post by Eric W. » Fri Feb 18, 2005 7:17 pm

AndyDursin wrote:I'm not overly techno-savvy on this, but DTS has always been preferable to Dolby Digital among cinephiles. The main reason being is that DTS is supposed to be closer to the bandwith of an actual CD track. DTS tracks are less compressed than Dolby Digital, requiring more space....and all of this goes back to how the formats are used in theatrical exhibition. DTS tracks are actually ON separate CDs (timed precisely with the film being projected), whereas the more-compressed Dolby Digital tracks are on the film itself.

On DVD, it's again a matter of compression. DTS tracks require more space than DD, meaning they're less compressed than Dolby Digital tracks. Hence, the DTS track is almost always louder, clearer, crisper, and more dynamic than Dolby Digital. (It's also a reason not every DVD has a DTS track -- it can take up twice the space of a Dolby Digital track).

I can always discern a difference between the two formats -- the DTS track is almost always "warmer," and never needs to be turned up as loud as a 5.1 DD mix.

Most DVD mixes, however, can't compare to a dynamic laserdisc presentation, which is still the best audiophile home format.....uncompressed, pure DTS and Dolby Digital tracks absolutely rock on laserdisc, and if you have a basic (2-channel or mono) Dolby Surround track, the laserdisc beats DVD hands down every time (as there's little compression involved on LD -- it's like having an actual CD of the soundtrack). DVD audio tracks can get awfully compressed dependant on the movie.
I hope you got paid a commission for this somewhere, my man. 8)

I love DTS. I always choose it when it's available. I'm disappointed to see that this will not have it, even though Mann's recent Collateral thankfully did.

Any SE should have both DD and DTS first and foremost.

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